Category: Misc

Pressing Issues: How To Install A Press-Fit BB

I really gotta stop posting these ‘red-herrings’. I just like fucking with you people though. For the record; not a press-fit BB…

You kick your front foot back hard, scooping the pedal back and flicking the cranks around underneath you with your battered Vans.  Something is wrong.  Your cranks squeak to a halt a mere 180 degrees from their original position.  Your feet slap down anti-climatically upon the asphalt.  Your heel-bruise worsens.  The attractive woman who was showing mild interest as she walked past looks away in embarrassment and quickens her pace.  Your peers nonchalantly look back down to their smartphones in silence; Courage Adams just posted on Insta and he actually lands his tricks… You try again- you kick back harder, grunt a little, people can smell your desperation now.  This time you get a better grip of the remaining three pins left in your pedal.  ‘This is the one…’ you think, ‘the fist bumps are coming my way.’
As you lay there, tangled among steel tubes, bleeding from a chunk missing from your Achilles tendon (probably caused by a Schrödinger’s pedal; a pedal that paradoxically seems unable to grip the bottom of your shoes yet will savagely butcher any part of your body it may end up touching) with your pride in tatters, thinking ‘Maybe I should make crankflips easy for myself and just ride a cassette…. like Courage.’  you might be better off by simply lubing your chain and changing your bottom bracket.

There are plenty of crank installation videos out there, this Merritt one being the latest example.  While it gives you some good pointers on crank installation, it completely skips the BB installation stage so today I’m going to take you through what it takes to properly measure and install your new bottom bracket like a goddamn… god!  We’ve all seen a number of wrong ways to fit a BB; some accidental, some on purpose, and with the evolution of the BB slowed down to a halt on the extremely efficient press-fit Mid sized BB shell, I’d say it’s high time to explain how to install the sucker correctly. Continue reading

BMX And Unplanned Obsolescence

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One thing that has always fascinated me about BMX or more specifically; the economy of BMX- is the current lack and decreasing amount of what is commonly known in ‘the real world’ as planned obsolescence.  Planned obsolescence, for anyone unfamiliar with the term, is the reason you buy a new phone every year, a new games console every 2 years, a new TV every 3 years, a new fridge every 4 years, etc; instead of every 10 years- for ALL of them.  It’s not that companies can’t produce a games console that wouldn’t overheat and melt the solder, or a phone that doesn’t bend in your pocket or smash when you drop it, it’s that it doesn’t make them anywhere near as much money if they make a product that lasts a decade rather than last two years- even if they charged double for it.  800 quid per person every ten years? Or 400 quid every two years? (equating to 2000 per person every decade) It’s a very easy business decision.  The downside is that we are polluting the very planet we are stuck on with our broken junk, merely in the quest for profit.  Thanks to everyone who participates in making BMX what it is, we truely have something we can be proud of; our own little world where planned obsolescence is kept to a bare minimum. Continue reading

Headsets Revisited- A Decade On

 

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When S&M unveiled the first BMX frame to feature an integrated headset over 10 years ago, it was met with puzzled looks and optimism alike; would it be that much easier to install? Would it be expensive to convert from Aheadsets to integrated? Where did this revolutionary design come from?  Let’s have a quick recap… Continue reading

Skapegoat Bob Bars And The Case For Bike Fitting

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I’ve been holding off writing anything about Skapegoat’s Bob Scerbo bars for a little while, not least for their rich yet turbulent history that has already been well documented (let’s break it down briefly for anyone who’s not up to speed; GT made them originally, Bob had his Animal signature bars made in their image, Animal made them bigger for the masses, Bob didn’t like that, 7.8″ versions stopped being made, everyone missed them, a few imitations and variations got made, Bob didn’t like that either so he had some made by S&M under his Skapegoat brand) but because I knew a follow up to the original DIG Bob bar article would surely surface sooner or later.  In said ‘Opinionated‘ article, Brian Tunney brings up some interesting points about bar sizes and angles and speculates as to why some people may or may not still be into these iconic street-specific bars.  While there are things in his article I may disagree with to a small degree, the discussion about bar sizes and angles is a subject often avoided that I and many others take a great amount of interest in. Continue reading

The Union’s Evolutions Of The BMX Fork

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The Union posted an awesome article on the evolution of the BMX fork featuring a plethora of examples of some of the defining designs of the old-to-mid school era.  Some of the more wild examples include Kasta’s Uniblade fork, Hutch Trickstar forks and the S&M Ditchforks shown below with peg and AD990 mounts.  I’ve totally still got a pair of those Terrible One forks in my shed…

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Chrome Ain’t Cool

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Chromium plating (usually known simply as ‘chrome’) has been a staple finish for BMX bikes and parts pretty much since the sport’s inception when I was little more than a glint in the milkman’s eye.  Everybody from yours truly to your little brother has run chrome plated parts; rims being the steady favourite for generations (you can’t deny that it’s a classic look) partly due to being a harder wearing brake surface than anodizing.  While it’s nice to have nice things, the horrible truth is that although chrome plating has aesthetic advantages, it has a far darker side behind the scenes.

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The biggest structural flaw with chrome plated parts is in the structural steel components like frames, bars, and cranks and is caused by something called ‘sacrificial metals’.  When electroplating a steel component, it is first negatively charged by an electrical source before being immersed in a chromic acid bath with a sacrificial zinc or carbon anode; of which is positively charged.  The anode is (in layman’s terms) used to prevent the iron in your part from losing it’s electrons thus attracting oxygen molecules and turning into a lump of rust in the acid/electrolyte bath. The anode loses the electrons instead and it oxidises in place of the iron; this is a good example of a ‘sacrificial metal’.  This technique is also used on cheap zinc-covered town-bike spokes, roofing and even for ship hulls.

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Unfortunately there is a bad example too.  If the necessary pre-treatments of stripping, cleaning, sanding, polishing, multiple layers of copper and nickel plating etc, etc aren’t done properly then there will be flaws in the chrome when it comes to chrome plating eg. porous texture, poor adhesion, perforations etc.  While I use the word ‘flaws’, don’t think of them as cute, minor little flaws like a bubble in your grips or a small buckle in your rim; these are disastrous flaws that, if unchecked over long periods, can and may well maim you.  Chrome plating keeps water away from the iron contained in the tubes of (let’s say for argument’s sake) your bars and preventing them from rusting as a barrier layer but the problem is that iron is anodic to the nickel in the same way that zinc is anodic to iron.  The slightest perforation in the plating (of which can easily be caused by manufacturing or rider error; defective chrome plating, grinding, crashing, even simple installation can damage the plating if you’re not careful- chromium is plated by the millionth of an inch) not only makes the tubing vulnerable to rust but because iron is anodic to the plating itself, the rusting is actually accelerated by the chrome plating that’s supposed to be protecting it- the steel literally sacrifices itself for the chrome.  This is why you’ll see old American cars with rusted out bumpers with the chrome peeling away where the steel has corroded underneath to the point where it’s barely there any more.  This site is a good place for more information about chrome plating as a finish.

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It doesn’t end there though, while searching for distribution info on the FlyBikes website last week, I stumbled across an interesting section on their frequently-asked-questions portion of the page;

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While the structural (and weight) disadvantages of chrome has been more or less clear to me for years and usually steered me away from actually spending money on it, I had no clue of the environmental or the human cost of a mere finish.

Spotting that Flybikes FAQ explaining their wholly righteous reason for not offering chrome colour options prompted me to do some good old Google trawling on the negative health affects of chromium plating; there was a lot of material.  This report by the Centre of Disease Control and Prevention was the most reliable literature I could find on the subject; being the CDCP is a government agency and the fact that the US chrome plating industry is pretty damn big so they probably know what they are talking about.

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There are two different types of decorative chrome plating, trivalent and hexavalent; the stuff that made Erin Brockovich a household name.  Unfortunately I can’t tell the difference scientifically because I only have a very limited understanding of these things but trivalent is basically ‘modern’ chrome, it has more of a nickel tint whereas hexavalent is the classic ‘old school’ stuff; harder wearing, blue-r tint but heavily regulated by the state and for good reason, hexavalent chromium is hugely toxic.  It’s trivalent counter part is not quite as harmful, has less stringent exhaust regulations and is easier to waste treat; spilling a small beaker of it’s hexavalent counterpart on your garage floor has the potential to poison any nearby wells and land you in some deep trouble.

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The gases emitted by the chromic acid are the super dangerous part about hexavalent chromium, without adequate fume-extraction or personal protective equipment, a chrome worker is subject to some horrific illnesses including but probably not limited to; cancers of the lung, trachea, and bronchus, contact dermatitis, skin ulcers, irritation and ulceration of the inner nasal lining (nasal mucosa) as well as perforation of the nasal septum- a symptom commonly associated with prolonged cocaine abuse.  The CDCP findings also report of kidney damage, liver damage, pulmonary congestion and edema, epigastric pain, erosion and discolouration of teeth, and even perforated ear drums.  In the case of the nasal ailments, on average the symptoms start manifesting within the first month of employment with a chrome plating shop.

This passage from the CDCP report was stood out to me as the most troubling though;

..11 male employees in an Ohio electroplating facility reported that most men had worked in the “hard-chrome” area* for the majority of their employment (average duration: 7.5 years; range: 3–16 years). Four of the 11 workers had a perforated nasal septum. Nine of the 11 men had hand scars resulting from past chrome ulcerations. Other effects found during the investigation included nose bleeds, “runny nose,” and nasal ulcerations..

*Hard-chrome is often known as ‘engineering chrome’ and is used for lubricity or oil retention in things like car engine parts and gun barrels.  Although essentially the same as it’s decorative counterpart, it’s applied in thousandths of an inch rather than millionths like decorative chrome.

So what can be done?  It depends on how much you like your chrome bike I guess, you could hassle your favourite companies via social media into telling you whether they’re using hexavalent or trivalent chrome (to the untrained eye it’s hard to tell the difference) and only buy trivalent if like me, your conscience is getting the better of you.  You could even boycott using chrome parts altogether until there’s better identification of whether they’re using trivalent or not, there are plenty of adequate alternatives including fine polishing, anodising and even certain types of chrome-look paint that look great, come in more colour options, weigh less, are less harmful to the environment and are better suited to people who live in wetter climates.  If you already have chrome parts, you can take better care of them by spraying something like J P Weigle’s Frame Saver into the inside of the tubes and generally keeping the outside of them clean with soapy water… and by not grinding.  The choice is yours at the end of the day; vote with your wallet.

 

Slacking Off- A Brief Study In Freecoaster Slack

Occasionally with a ‘job’ like this, I’ll be lucky enough to be sent parts to test by companies going through research and development stages of making new BMX components, my main qualification to do so is being able to throw a bike around while still being able to analyse a broken one better than simply saying ‘I fell and it broked!’
Then one day someone will pull a cruel joke and send you not one, but two types of freecoaster to test knowing full well how you feel about that kind of heresy and witchcraft… but with me being ever curious about new technologies emerging and not wanting to be left behind, I gladly accepted the task.
Trying out both clutch and pawl type freecoasters, I figured out that while the pawl type was the easiest to use, the clutch type was best for adjustability and thus, reliability (in the respect it won’t engage and throw you on your arse as easily when rolling backwards) due to being able to remove/ add slack spacers at will. This is something that can’t be done with a pawl type coaster without using a different clutch-disk or slack cam ring- depending on which brand you ride.  This is not to say that you are completely out of options when it comes to slack adjustability though; the following factors can also play a part in the time it takes your hub to engage;

Gearing.

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A higher gear ratio where a larger sprocket, or a smaller driver, is used so higher top speeds can be reached does so because a larger sprocket like a 27T-9T ratio for example, pulls more chain links over the driver with each pedal stroke than a smaller 25T sprocket pulls over a 9T driver; it works the same way that a single point on the outer edge of a vinyl record will move faster than a point in the middle despite it having the same number of revolutions per minute- except there’s a chain wrapped around it.  What this also does is reduce the time it takes for your rear hub to engage as chain gets pulled over your driver at a faster rate when your gear ratio is higher.  In the days of cassette hubs and freewheels (if you’ve been riding as long as some) this wasn’t so much of an issue but with freecoasters and fakie tricks coming back into popularity, it’s something that is of much greater importance.  If you’ve got steady legs and a desire to bomb it around at mach 10 then you could probably get away with something like 27 or 26T-9t but if you like a bit of room for error when moving your feet around while coasting backwards then maybe stick to a lower 25T-9T, no one likes a bruised arse.

Crank Arm Length.

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While 175mm tends to be the standard go-to length for BMX cranks they can usually range from around 165mm to 180mm depending on your height, riding style or personal preference so for arguments sake we’re just going to talk about the two extremes of long (eg. 180mm) and short (165mm).  If you imagine the crank in it’s engaged and disengaged position as well as the distance between the pedal spindles as a kind of triangle (as illustrated in the shoddy MSpaint diagram above) you can see that the red lines represent the set freecoaster slack angle but you can see that the slack effectively widens as the cranks get longer.  It’s worth noting that the difference is negligible but noticeable if you go between 165mm and 180mm cranks although virtually non-existent if you were running 175mm cranks to begin with, but you know, every little counts sometimes…

Chain Tension.

It’s pretty much common knowledge that freecoaster driver bearings really do not like tight chains but a loose chain can also artificially increase your freecoaster slack angle as well as help your bearings last longer.  Before your hub even starts to engage your legs have to make the chain tension enough to pull the chain over the driver to begin with so the slacker the chain; the slacker the angle, obvious enough.  But that also increases the likelihood of your bike sounding like a rusty bag of nails inside a biscuit tin so exercise restraint with that one kids.

While I’m sure all of the above is quite obvious to some older riders including the Bikeguide police, and I’m sure it’ll get picked apart in some way or another but the main point I want to make is that it’s not something that gets talked about a whole lot, especially to younger riders, despite being a big issue in BMX today. That said, if there are any points I’ve missed feel free to hit me up at oberzine@hotmail.com.

The Inaccuracy Of Tyre Labelling/ The Birth Of The 21″ Wheel

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The term ’20 inch bike’ gets thrown around a lot, usually by douchebag pseudo-journalists like me trying to contextualise their gonzo style drivel about dudes riding or making little 20 inch kids stunt bikes… see, i’m at it again. Cruising on the interwebiverse one day I came across this photo on 22 inch BMX‘s Facebook/Instagram/whatever of Kye Forte’s ride;

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The striking thing about it is the addition of 22 inch forks and front wheel whilst the rear wheel remains 20 inch… yet, somehow, it doesn’t look too odd at all.  While one could argue all day about the benefits or hindrances this set up might provide(a big one being head angle, but I’ll get to that shortly) one thought awoke and wouldn’t slumber; what even makes it a 22 inch wheel? What, for that matter, makes a 20 inch wheel a 20 inch wheel?! Continue reading

Can You Dig It’s Brutally Honest Certified Helmet Buyers Guide

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It’s the elephant in the room again… Jon at Can You Dig It posted this highly amusing review of all the CPSC/CE certified helmets he could get his shovel wielding hands on.  He gives each of them a fair trial before listing the positives and the negatives of which if we’re honest, we’re all more concerned about here.  He even picks a clear winner, we won’t reveal it here but I can tell you it’s (thankfully) not the ugly luminous green/black one that looks straight out of Starship Troopers.

Are Bikes As Good As They Will Ever Get?

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Probably the most time saving invention to be applied to BMX’s; the press-fit Mid BB

Fourteen years have flown by since I first walked into a bike shop as a twelve year old, decided that mountain biking was far too expensive a pursuit for my budget and rather than dispiritedly retreating out the shop door back in front of the TV, I opted for a BMX bike.  For a young boy I think it was the most logical of choices, primarily for steering away from my previous life as a reclusive Playstation enthusiast but also the kind of bike I chose to do it on.  BMX caught my eye that day with its sheer stripped back simplicity that no other cycling sub-culture had bred before.

Continue reading